The jury and democracy
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The jury and democracy how jury deliberation promotes civic engagement and political participation by John Gastil

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Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Political participation -- United States,
  • Deliberative democracy -- United States,
  • Jury -- United States -- Decision making,
  • Jury duty -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementJohn Gastil ... [et al.].
ContributionsGastil, John.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJK1764 .J87 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24029073M
ISBN 109780195377309, 9780195377316
LC Control Number2010001318

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The jury is a quintessentially democratic institution, the lay cog in a criminal justice machine dominated by lawyers, judges and police. Today, however, the jury finds itself under attack - on the. Book published In late , we combined all of our project’s findings in a book by Oxford University Press, The Jury and Democracy: How Jury Deliberation Promotes Civic Engagement and Political Participation. You can order copies online directly from Oxford University Press or at   Justice, Democracy and the Jury is an attempt to place the jury within a historical, political and philosophical framework, and to analyse the decision-making processes at work on a by: 4. Studies in Penal Theory and Philosophy Contributes a needed critical dimension to social science research on the jury as a democratic institution. Political theory has not yet addressed criminalization and over-incarceration as research problems; this book breaks ground in focusing democratic theory on criminal justice.

This magisterial book explores fascinating cases from American history to show how juries remain the heart of our system of criminal justice - and an essential element of our democracy. No other 3/5(2). That's because these trials foster moral experiences. They expose jurors to people they wouldn’t have otherwise conversed with. They're agents of democracy. And they’re dying. In Wisconsin last year, 2, cases went before a jury in , out of , total dispositions. Of , criminal cases, just 1, saw a jury — or percent. Using the prism of the Sixth Amendment community jury trial, this book offers fresh and much-needed ways to incorporate the citizenry into the procedures of criminal justice, thereby resulting in greater investment and satisfaction in the system. The result was Democracy in America, published in two volumes in and , a classic still cited by virtually every historian of American government, as well as presidents and political philosophers and anyone seeking a deeper understanding of the actual practice of democracy.

Publisher description: Written by the preeminent democratic theorist of our time, this book explains the nature, value, and mechanics of democracy. This new edition includes two additional chapters by Ian Shapiro, Dahl’s successor as Sterling Professor of Political Science at Yale and a leading contemporary authority on democracy. The Jury and Democracy How Jury Deliberation Promotes Civic Engagement and Political Participation John Gastil, E. Pierre Deess, Philip J. Weiser, and Cindy Simmons. First book to present strong empirical evidence linking jury service and increased civic participation; Demonstrates the impact jury service has on even the most disengaged citizens. This magisterial book explores fascinating cases from American history to show how juries remain the heart of our system of criminal justice - and an essential element of our democracy. No other institution of government rivals the jury in placing power so directly in the hands of citizens.4/5(1). Finally, The Jury and Democracy provides compelling systematic evidence to support this view. Drawing from in-depth interviews, thousands of juror surveys, and court and voting records from across the United States, the authors show that serving on a jury can trigger changes in how citizens view themselves, their peers, and their government Price: $