Bedlam: a poem
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Bedlam: a poem

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Published by printed for the author in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEighteenth century -- reel 1343, no. 06.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[2],5-18p.
Number of Pages18
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16954899M

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  If I had a list of books that took me more than five attempts to finish - Bedlam would be #1. A tale of historical fiction set within the walls of notorious Bedlam seemed like a promising read. But the language was dense at times, superfluous at other times, and overall just not captivating enough to keep me interested in getting to the end/5(30).   Perhaps the Greatest Anonymous Poem in English: “Tom O’Bedlam” This is an anonymous lyric, discovered in a commonplace book of about Following the poem are some notes by critic Harold Bloom. Poem and notes are copied from his excellent book  How To Read and Why. — Major parcas Insane minori. Where proud Augusta, blest with long Repose, Her ancient Wall and ruin'd Bulwark shows; Close by a verdant Plain, with graceful Height A stately Fabric rises to the Sight. Yet, though its Parts all elegantly shine, And sweet Proportion crowns the whole Design; Though Art, in strong expressive Sculpture shown, Consummate Art informs the breathing. Valuing the lived experience, Nicole and Patrick envision Bedlam Book Cafe as a hub of social and intellectual energy, and as a resource for writers, scholars, artists, poets, and interested readers. And with a rotating menu of fresh organic juices & smoothies, Bedlam nourishes the body as well as the mind. Bedlam Book Cafe actively buys books.

The HyperTexts Tom O' Bedlam's Song Anyone who hasn't read "Tom O'Bedlam's Song" hasn't really lived. Reading the final stanza is like reading (and getting) the gist of Don Quixote in short burst of magnificently evocative language. Tilting at windmills has never seemed so exotic, or .   Wow. I feel a little embarrassed that I didn’t know about Tom o’ Bedlam before now. l read the Mercedes Lackey books ‘Knight of Ghosts and Shadows’, ‘Summoned to Tourney’, ‘Beyond World’s End’ ‘Spirits White as Lightning’ ‘A Host of Furious Fancies’ ‘Mad ‘Maudlin’ and ‘Music to my Sorrow’ without any idea that this was where the titles came from! There are soooo many good poems by Lucille Clifton to choose from (“ homage to my hips” is such a fave of mine!). but I chose “the earth is a living thing” because it seemed most relevant right now. there’s so much to admire about this poem - the folksy tone, the way she infuses black beauty with descriptions of the earth, the way the language feels so common yet it’s. To celebrate National Poetry Month, I asked the inimitable Tom O’Bedlam — whose mesmerizing voice you might recall from “Gabriel” by Adrienne Rich and “Antilamentation” by Dorianne Laux — to read “Ode to the Book” by Pablo Neruda, translated by Nathaniel Tarn and found in the anthology Selected Poems (public library). Enjoy.